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Department of Health Policy Archives

Education, school quality top concerns for parents: poll

Jan. 20, 2022—A new poll of Tennessee parents from the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy has found that education and school quality top the list of parental concerns in the state.

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Study finds sexual minority communities disproportionately engage in behaviors to reduce medication costs

Jan. 6, 2022—Vanderbilt research finds that individuals from sexual minority populations, including members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer communities, are more likely than heterosexual individuals to engage in behaviors to reduce medication costs.

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Opioid use disorder treatment access increases in areas with large Medicaid population

Jan. 4, 2022—  by Jill Clendening Researchers report that in communities where Medicaid is a more common source of insurance, providers of buprenorphine, an effective treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), are much less likely to discriminate between Medicaid and privately insured prospective patients, but patients with either type of coverage still face many barriers to obtaining...

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Study finds sexual minority communities disproportionately engage in behaviors to reduce medication costs

Dec. 29, 2021—People from sexual minority populations, including members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer communities, are more likely than heterosexual people to engage in behaviors to reduce medication costs.

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Study finds apixaban (Eliquis) is preferable to rivaroxaban (Xarelto) for stroke prevention, reduced bleeding complications

Dec. 21, 2021—  by Jill Clendening There is strong evidence that the medication apixaban (Eliquis) is preferable to rivaroxaban (Xarelto) for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), with both reduced rates of severe bleeding complications as well as strokes, according to study published Dec. 21 in JAMA. An estimated 3 million to 6 million persons...

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Study finds higher deaths among veterans in 2020, but less than general population

Nov. 9, 2021—  by Jake Lowary More U.S. veterans died in 2020 than in prior years, but the increase was less than the increase in the general population, a new study of Veterans Health Administration (VA) data by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Boston University (BU) finds. Overall, the study, published in The Lancet...

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Study examines long-term benefit of Two-Midnight Rule

Nov. 4, 2021—Vanderbilt research is raising new questions about the long-term benefit and value of the so-called Medicare “Two-Midnight Rule” implemented in 2013 to reduce costly and potentially unnecessary inpatient hospital admissions

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HCV infection among pregnant people increasing

Oct. 29, 2021—  by Emily Stembridge Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to long-term health problems including liver damage, liver failure, cirrhosis, liver cancer and even death. These outcomes are especially dangerous for pregnant people and their babies. The leading cause of HCV in the U.S. is injection drug use as a result of opioid use...

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Griffin, Sergent honored for their contributions to diversity, inclusion

Aug. 26, 2021—Marie Griffin, MD, MPH, and John Sergent, MD, were recognized for their contributions to diversity and inclusion during a portrait unveiling ceremony sponsored by the Office of Diversity Affairs.

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Dusetzina appointed to federal Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

Jun. 2, 2021—Stacie Dusetzina, PhD, associate professor of Health Policy and Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, has been appointed to a three-year term on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC).

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VUMC’s Lee among group to earn Kenneth J. Arrow Award for health economics research

May. 3, 2021—Scott Lee, MD, PhD, MPA, MPhil, assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has received the Kenneth J. Arrow Award for health economics research given by the International Health Economics Association.

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Study finds increased risk of serious opioid events in mothers, regardless of dose

Apr. 26, 2021—A new study from Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers finds that new mothers who receive opioids after uncomplicated vaginal births face an increased risk of serious opioid-related events regardless of the opioid dosage, a finding that could significantly impact care delivery.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Vanderbilt Medicine
Hope
Momentum
VUMC Voice

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