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Eric Skaar Archives

Excess dietary manganese increases risk of staph infection in heart

Sep. 21, 2017—Too much dietary manganese — an essential trace mineral found in leafy green vegetables, fruits and nuts — promotes infection of the heart by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (“staph”).

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Investigators use light to kill microbial ‘vampires’

Jul. 27, 2017—On July 24 Vanderbilt scientist Eric Skaar, Ph.D., MPH, summarized his group’s latest paper in a tweet: “If S. aureus is going to drink our blood like a vampire, let's kill it with sunlight.”

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New institute to focus on immune system

Jun. 29, 2017—Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) is launching a new institute to coordinate initiatives among the rapidly evolving disciplines of infection biology, immunology and inflammatory diseases.

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VUMC investigators find pathogens work together to infect host

Nov. 3, 2016—Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus — two pathogens that frequently co-infect the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis — appear to cooperate with each other, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. When pseudomonas is starved for metal by the host, it shuts down the production of factors that would normally kill staph, promoting a co-infection.

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Study shows excess dietary zinc worsens C. diff infection

Sep. 26, 2016—Too much dietary zinc increases susceptibility to infection by Clostridium difficile — “C. diff” — the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections.

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Detect and defend against pathogens

Nov. 4, 2015—Understanding factors, such as the receptor TLR9, that detect and defend against pathogens may lead to therapeutic approaches that promote an effective immune response to treat infections.

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Skaar receives American Asthma Foundation award

Aug. 6, 2015—Eric Skaar, Ph.D., MPH, the Ernest W. Goodpasture Professor of Pathology, has received a Scholar Award from the American Asthma Foundation (AAF).

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Skaar elected to American Academy of Microbiology

Mar. 19, 2015—  Eric Skaar, Ph.D., MPH, the Ernest W. Goodpasture Professor of Pathology, has been elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology. Skaar is one of seven current Vanderbilt faculty members who are AAM fellows. The 2,400-member academy is an honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology, the world’s oldest and largest...

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Physician-scientist is dream job for Vanderbilt’s Cassat

Dec. 4, 2014—Jim Cassat, M.D., Ph.D., a pediatric infectious disease specialist who joined the Vanderbilt faculty this summer, loves taking care of children with bone infections and doing research to understand the host-pathogen interactions during these invasive infections.

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Staph ‘gangs’ share nutrients during infection: study

Oct. 16, 2014—Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. The findings shed light on a long-standing question in infectious diseases and may inform new treatment strategies.

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Faculty meeting highlights VUSM achievements

May. 29, 2014—Despite a challenging health care landscape, Vanderbilt University Medical Center continues to advance the highest-quality patient care, train the next generation of physician leaders and push forward the frontiers of biomedical science.

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Anthrax bacteria’s signaling systems

Apr. 15, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have identified a new signaling system that anthrax bacteria uses to infect its host.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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