New England Journal of Medicine

New study illustrates how much it would cost for cancer drugs covered under Medicare Part D

A new study by Vanderbilt researchers highlights how some older Americans diagnosed with cancer can face unlimited out-of-pocket spending for prescription drugs under the current structure of the Medicare Part D benefit.

International study supports dupilumab for treatment of moderate-to-severe asthma in children

In a late-stage clinical trial, the biologic agent dupilumab reduced the rate of severe asthma attacks and improved lung function and asthma control for children ages 6 to 11 with moderate-to-severe asthma, offering a new option to these patients.

VUMC is pacesetter for national aspirin study

According to an innovative large-scale clinical trial reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, a single daily baby aspirin (81 mg) or a single daily adult aspirin (325 mg) are equally safe and effective for prevention of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

A young doctor wrote of a life-or-death moment caring for a patient. The New England Journal of Medicine published it as a graphic novel.

A terrifying tale from her first weekend on call.

Christopher Hughes, MD, left, Pratik Pandharipande, MD, MSCI, and colleagues are studying two drugs recommended for patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU.

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective

Sedative medications used in intensive care are associated with increased delirium, which is in turn connected with higher medical costs and greater risk of death and ICU-related dementia.

Treating appendicitis with antibiotics instead of surgery may be good option for some, but not all, patients

Antibiotics instead of surgery may be a good choice for some, but not all, patients with appendicitis, according to results from a study reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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