Skip to main content

York named Medical Scientist Training Program associate director

Jun. 19, 2014, 8:27 AM

 

Sally York, M.D., Ph.D.

Sally York, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology, has been appointed associate director of the Vanderbilt Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP).

The goal of the MSTP is to train leaders in biomedical research and human medicine while earning both M.D. and Ph.D. degrees.

In her role as associate director, York will supervise the MSTP Clinical Preceptorship Program and the MSTP Continuity Clinical Experience. She also will serve as the administrative coordinator of the MSTP Career Development Workshop and advise senior MSTP students about career choices and residency placements.

“We are thrilled to have recruited Dr. York to the MSTP leadership team. She is an immensely talented physician scientist and will be a superb MSTP associate director,” said Terence Dermody, M.D., the Dorothy Overall Wells Professor of Pediatrics and MSTP director since 2003.

York received M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University in St. Louis and was actively involved with the Duke MSTP while a member of the faculty at that institution. “She will bring substantial expertise and knowledge about physician-scientist training to our program,” Dermody said.

“I am delighted to join the Vanderbilt MSTP,” said York, a medical oncologist whose research focuses on lung cancer and cancer genetics. “This training program is near and dear to my heart as it serves to foster the development of outstanding physician-scientists.”

Vanderbilt has had an M.D./Ph.D. program since 1964, which was formally recognized as the MSTP in 1977. The program has graduated 219 physician-scientists and includes many alumni who have attained leadership positions in academic medicine.

Currently there are 102 students in the program, mentored by 59 faculty members.

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

more