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schizophrenia Archives

Working memory in psychotic disorders

Jul. 11, 2019—Functional MRI studies have revealed that targeting activation of certain brain regions may improve working memory and cognition in psychotic disorders.

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Early detection of schizophrenia

Jun. 24, 2019—Inhibited temperament — a tendency to respond to novelty with wariness, fear or caution — may be a risk factor for schizophrenia that could be targeted for preventative interventions.

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$10 million gift bolsters psychosis research efforts

Jun. 13, 2019—A $10 million endowed gift will fund translational research, support clinical programs and create an endowed chair within the Department of Psychiatry.

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Immune ‘pruning’ in schizophrenia

Apr. 25, 2019—Ariel Deutch and colleagues have discovered that overactive brain immune cells during adolescence may contribute to schizophrenia.

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Researchers find high-risk genes for schizophrenia

Apr. 18, 2019—Using a unique computational framework they developed, a team of scientist cyber-sleuths in the Vanderbilt University Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute (VGI) has identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia.

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Treatment resistance of mental disorders studied

Mar. 28, 2019—With the aid of a four-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) will apply new techniques to investigate treatment resistance of two devastating mental disorders — major depressive disorder, which befalls 15 percent of people at some point in their lives, and schizophrenia, which affects approximately 1 percent.

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Cytokine-cognition connection

Oct. 1, 2018—Targeting the immune system may provide a new avenue for therapeutic intervention in psychiatric diseases characterized by motivational and cognitive deficits.

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Shared genetics may shape treatment options for certain brain disorders

Jun. 14, 2018—Symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, including psychosis, depression and manic behavior, have both shared and distinguishing genetic factors, an international consortium led by researchers from Vanderbilt University and Virginia Commonwealth University is reporting.

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Brain connections in schizophrenia

Mar. 9, 2018—Brain imaging studies have implicated the connection between two brain regions in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

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Vanderbilt signs licensing, research agreements to develop new approach to schizophrenia treatment

Jan. 8, 2018—Under the terms of the licensing agreement, Lundbeck has exclusively licensed rights to compounds developed at Vanderbilt that act on a receptor in the brain that has been implicated in schizophrenia.

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Vanderbilt begins Phase 1 trials of new Alzheimer’s drug

Aug. 7, 2017—Developed at Vanderbilt, VU319 is designed to precisely target a specific neuron receptor associated with cognitive function while avoiding potentially dangerous side effects.

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Investigational new drug for Alzheimer’s scheduled for first study in humans

Dec. 27, 2016—Vanderbilt University scientists have received notification from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that testing in humans may proceed for an investigational new drug for Alzheimer's disease after more than 10 years of research by scientists at Vanderbilt University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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