Parkinson’s disease

Stephen Purcell

It’s been 16 years since sweet-spot brain stimulation slowed Parkinson’s progression for Hermitage man

In 2008 at VUMC there were a group of doctors trying something unheard of on a handful of patients who signed up for their study. Half would receive deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery in attempt to slow the progression of their early-stage Parkinson’s disease, and the others would not.

VUMC recognized for atypical Parkinsonism care and research

Vanderbilt’s Department of Neurology has been named a CurePSP Center of Care

Study suggests way to relieve cognitive deficits caused by Parkinson’s disease

Vanderbilt research raises the possibility of using DBS to slow the decline of cognitive function, a major source of disability, diminished quality of life, and death in more than three-quarters of patients with Parkinson’s disease.

photo of David Charles and Mallory Hacker

Deep brain sweet spot might be key to halt Parkinson’s

A sweet spot in the deep brain with direct lines of communication to motor regions far out on the cerebral cortex might hold a key to halting the progression of early-stage Parkinson’s disease.

The certification team included, from left, Arlene Boudreaux, MSN, RN, CNRN, Ryan Schell, PharmD, BCPS, Fenna Phibbs, MD, MPH, and Jessica Stroh, RN. (photo by Donn Jones)

VUMC receives national certification for Parkinson’s disease care

Vanderbilt University Medical Center recently became the nation’s second health care organization to receive The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Parkinson’s Disease Certification.

Study examines impulsiveness in Parkinson’s disease

Vanderbilt researchers are studying aspects of dopamine release and its regulation in Parkinson’s patients with and without impulsive-compulsive behaviors.

1 2 3