Skip to main content

Calcium intake and colorectal cancer

Oct. 18, 2017, 8:00 AM

Calcium plays key roles in cellular signaling, proliferation and death. Previous studies exploring the relationship between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer have had contradictory results, perhaps due to no consideration of variation in calcium reabsorption by the kidney.

Qi Dai, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues examined how variation in genes involved in calcium reabsorption related to the risk of colorectal adenoma (pre-cancer lesion) in patients enrolled in the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. They found that variants in a sodium-calcium exchanger protein interacted with calcium intake in colorectal adenoma risk.

They further found that carriers of variants in two of three calcium reabsorption genes with calcium intake above 1000 mg/day were up to 57 percent less likely to have adenomas compared to those with lower calcium intake.

The findings, reported in the October issue of Molecular Carcinogenesis, suggest a protective effect of calcium intake in individuals with certain gene variants and may provide a new approach for personalized prevention of colorectal adenoma and cancer.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (AT004660, CA121060, CA149633, CA182364, CA068485, CA095103, RR024975) and the American Institute for Cancer Research.

Send suggestions for articles to highlight in Aliquots and any other feedback about the column to aliquots@vanderbilt.edu

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

more