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delirium Archives

AI predicts next-day delirium or coma in ICU patients

Sep. 30, 2021—A team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center used machine learning to predict the likelihood of next-day brain function status changes in critical care patients.

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Delirium and mortality reexamined

Jul. 8, 2021—A multicenter study of ICU patients found that in the hospital, delirium was associated with a nearly three-fold increase in risk of death the following day, but after discharge there was no association between delirium and mortality.

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Dexmedetomidine and delirium

Jun. 21, 2021—The sedative dexmedetomidine, when administered during or after heart surgery, is associated with postoperative delirium and adverse outcomes.

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Vanderbilt, Zambia researchers identify predictive factors of delirium in Sub-Saharan Africa

Apr. 22, 2021—Severity of illness, history of stroke, and being divorced or widowed were independently predictive of delirium in hospitalized patients in Zambia, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

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Vanderbilt, Zambia researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability in Sub-Saharan Africa

Feb. 11, 2021—Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

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Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients

Jan. 8, 2021—COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure. Choice of sedative medications and curbs on family visitation played a role in increasing acute brain dysfunction for these patients.

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Study to test cognitive rehab therapy for ICU survivors

May. 27, 2020—Vanderbilt University Medical Center will study adult survivors of medical and surgical intensive care at high risk for long-term cognitive impairment to see if computerized cognitive rehabilitation (CCR) is effective in improving cognition in ICU survivors who often have trouble doing complex tasks, maintaining their finances and staying employed.

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Damage, disruption, delirium

Apr. 20, 2020—New findings suggest that treatments that decrease oxidative damage might help with postoperative delirium that occurs in up to 30% of cardiac surgery patients.

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New software aims to prevent intensive care unit delirium

Jan. 8, 2020—Intensive care unit delirium, a fertile area of clinical research and patient care innovation associated with VUMC, is beginning to reshape how commercial electronic health record systems are engineered with regard to intensive care.

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Mobility protocol yields positive results in pediatric ICU

Mar. 7, 2019—For years Kristina Betters, MD, assistant professor of Pediatric Critical Care at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, has been aware of the value of getting patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) moving during their critical illnesses to prevent muscle breakdown, weakness and delirium.

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Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium: study

Oct. 22, 2018—Critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New center formed to treat, study ICU delirium, dementia

Oct. 4, 2018—Millions of patients in intensive care units each year develop delirium during their hospitalization and often leave the hospital with cognitive deficits similar to those suffering from traumatic brain injury or mild Alzheimer’s disease.

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