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Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy Archives

Preterm births in Tennessee decreased during pandemic

Mar. 15, 2021—Statewide stay-at-home orders put in place as Tennessee fought to control the spread of coronavirus last March were associated with a 14% lower rate of preterm birth, according to a research letter published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Poll findsTennessee parents concerned about education, children’s mental health as COVID-19 presses on

Jan. 21, 2021—The latest Vanderbilt Child Health Poll release found that many Tennessee parents are worried about the mental health of their children during the COVID-19 pandemic, and over 80% of parents had concerns about their children attending school remotely. The Poll also revealed that schooling practices and mental health concerns have varied widely among Tennessee families of different racial and economic groups.

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Study shows drastic increases in opioid-affected births

Jan. 12, 2021—The rate of mothers who had an opioid-related diagnosis when delivering their baby increased by 131% from 2010-2017, as the incidence of babies diagnosed with drug withdrawal, known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), increased by 82% nationally during that same time period.

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Tennessee’s uninsured children have doubled since 2019 and 2 in 5 live with food insecurity, poll finds

Dec. 21, 2020—In fall 2020, 9% of Tennessee children were uninsured, more than twice the level at the same time in 2019, according to a new poll conducted by the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy. Just 4% of children were uninsured in fall 2019, the poll found.

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Poll shows fewer than 6 in 10 Tennessee parents report wearing masks all the time, nearly half won’t vaccinate their children for COVID-19

Dec. 8, 2020—Many Tennessee parents are not wearing masks consistently to control community spread of COVID-19, despite recommendations from public health officials, according to new a poll conducted by the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy.

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Model helps predict which infants may go on to develop NAS

Nov. 12, 2020—A new Vanderbilt-designed prediction model may make it easier to determine which infants will go on to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns that occurs after exposure to opioids during pregnancy.

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Study finds patients’ access to opioid treatment cumbersome

Aug. 14, 2020—Women are having a difficult time getting into treatment for opioid addictions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Open.

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Patrick receives award for children’s health research

Aug. 6, 2020—Stephen Patrick, MD, MPH, MS, director of the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy, has been awarded the fifth annual Gale and Ira Drukier Prize in Children’s Health Research.

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Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress

Jul. 24, 2020—The ongoing disruptive changes from efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are having a substantial negative impact on the physical and mental well-being of parents and their children across the country, according to a new national survey published today in Pediatrics.

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Nearly one-third of Tennessee parents are worried their child has an undiagnosed mental health condition, new poll finds

Jul. 16, 2020—One-third of Tennessee parents with children ages 6-17 are worried their child has an undiagnosed mental health condition, a new poll from the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy found.

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Safeguarding opioids a concern as children may have more access with families at home due to COVID-19

Apr. 22, 2020—A new poll from the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy found that few Tennessee parents take steps to safeguard opioids at home, an important concern when children are spending more time indoors due to COVID-19 social distancing recommendations.

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Study finds most Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth are not later tested to see if they acquired the virus

Feb. 14, 2020—A recent study by researchers at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt and the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy found that in Tennessee, most infants exposed to hepatitis C virus at the time of birth are not tested later to see if they acquired the virus.

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